10 Fave Tumblr Posts on Les Miserables

My obssession for Les Mis has risen from the deep ocean like a Kraken. I had seen the movie in 2013 and I honestly thought it deserved the Academy Awards for Best Motion Picture than boring Argo. This was the first time I saw a serious musical and I thought Tom Hooper had really presented film-lovers with something to cherish for years. I had seen Argo around the same time and two days later I forgot about it. Les Mis is the kind of movie that stays with you, for days, for months, even your entire lifetime. Every time I hear ‘Do you hear the people sing?’ it send chills down my spine. Now, almost 2 years later, I’m still crying over the fate of Le Amis d’ABC.

The worst is that I cannot even talk about how passionate I am because no one in my family or friend-circle have even heard about Les Mis. I don’t live under a rock, I just live with a bunch of idiots. But when no one understands, Tumblr understands. On this website I found people who are still dedicatedly following Les Mis and often discussing it with each other. Out of all the heartwarming posts I’ve seen on Tumblr these are my faves:

This post makes me sob every time I read it and I read it at least once a day. I cry for the 22 year old young boys who sacrificed their lives for equality in 1832. But I also cry for all the children of today who are forced by circumstances to pick up a weapon. The Barricade Boys didn’t mean for the revolution to become so bloody, but once it started they didn’t want to stop either. Yet, at the end of the day they were just little boys fighting for what they thought was right, and it was. They didn’t know how to fight, they didn’t know how to hold a gun. But one thing they knew was that they were ready to die for what they believed in. And yet, they were just children.

Yes this scene really kills me, I mean the Barricade Boys are capable of killing, but they are also human beings. Seeing the blood of their childhood friends splattered on the floor, hearing the loud gunshot aiming straight for their heads, smelling the fear among the bravest of the boys must have crippled them. Anyone would be scared, anyone would be horrified. But they didn’t abandon the fight, they knew they were going to die. But they also knew that freedom was worth it.

I think by this point you can guess that my favourite part of Les Mis was the revolution and it was also I think the most ‘miserable’. The worst part was that the Barricade Boys were fighting for the freedom of the people and when the Barricade Boys were dying it was the same people who abandoned them. They died, everyone dies. But they died alone, believing that they failed.

Now I want to talk about the movie itself, what a magical piece of art it was. (Still can’t believe Argo won, fucking hell!) The music is mind-blowing, the cast is singing live (brownie-points for that), the sets are spectacular, the scenes are realistic, the poverty in Paris was hauntingly captured and Tom Hooper’s film will always be one of my favourite. There are several scenes in the movie that stole my breath away- Fantine’s ‘I dreamed a dreamed’, Valjean’s ‘Suddenly’, especially ‘Do you hear the people sing?’. But I cried the most during the finale and these weren’t sad tears, these were happy tears. To see all the people who died unfairly standing on the barricade proudly and singing of a better tomorrow was just too much to control.

It is needless to say that the one character who left a permanent mark on me was Enjolras. I have been a huge fan of Broadway star Aaron Tveit (he was stunning in ‘Rent’, ‘Wicked’ and my personal favourite musical ever ‘Next to Normal’) and I was looking forward to seeing his Enjolras. After seeing the 10th and 25th anniversary concerts of Les Mis on Youtube and countless other Enjolras’s on the web, I was a bit apprehensive it he would be able to pull it off or not. Again it is needless to say, but my baby killed it!

My favourite thing about Tumblr is that it pays so much attention to detail. I remember being up in the morning at 5 am to watch the Oscars because that is the time it is aired in my country. I remember my whole family was asleep because they couldn’t care less. I remember being completely mesmerised by the cast’s performance, especially Aaron’s. But the flags at the end really gave me goosebumps.

Another character who really scared me for life was this little bastard. Gavroche is barely 9 or 10 years old but he is singing about how fair death truly is. It comes for everyone, the rich as well as the poor. Poverty forces people to grow up so fast doesn’t it?

995ca-tyrion-books

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As a parting present these are some of my favourite passages from the Brick. Enjoy (I mean, sob with me):

The wording is so thrilling, you can actually picturize the entire scenario right before you eyes.

This part. I mean, it’s not I need a heart or anything Hugo. In what is easily the most romantic scene in the book—don’t talk to me about Marius and Cosette, okay—Grantaire appears as Enjolras is cornered by soldiers and about to die. Although he probably could have escaped death—the soldiers had passed him by—he approaches Enjolras and asks if Enjolras will permit him to stand at his side for the first and last time to die with him. Enjolras finally accepts him, and they go down together. Now that I’ve made you cry uncontrollably here’s some funny ones.

Aww why hasn’t anyone recorded this?

Frozen and Les Mis, my two favourite things.

This one is my absolute favourite. I know this post is long but the book itself is 1500 pages, what exactly were you expecting. Sometimes I think I’m really silly for obssessing over fictional scenarios and characters but then I realize, Hugo witnessed the barricades of 1832. The names changed, but what he wrote in that book is what he saw. An Enjolras watched broken hearted as his friends fell, a Combeferre stood and gave a great speech, a Marius saved the barricade, an Eponine died in the arms of someone she loved, and a Grantaire fell standing next to his hero. They might seem characters to me, but that night in 1832 they lived.

Advertisements

Share your thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s